Dissertation reading list

Fraiberg, Steven, and Xiaowei Cui. Pigg, Stacey, Jeffrey T.

Dissertation reading list

Teacher's College, Columbia University Registering for a Consortium Class Fordham students who wish to register for courses through the consortium must be matriculated in a GSAS doctoral program and must have completed at least one year of full-time doctoral study before taking a consortium course.

Only one consortium course may be taken each semester, and courses may not be taken through the consortium during the summer. Then obtain the signature of the chair of the philosophy department as well as the signature of the GSAS director of academic programs and support.

Dissertation reading list

After obtaining these required signatures on the registration form, make a photocopy of the signed and completed form, and deposit the photocopy with the philosophy department's secretary; then bring the completed form to Keating Hall, Room Deadlines for making consortium course changes add, drop, change of grade type are governed by the GSAS academic calendar.

Papers and Projects M.

Dissertation reading list

Possibilities for the special project include, but are not limited to: If one evaluator assigns a grade of Pass and the other assigns a grade of Fail, a third faculty member will evaluate the project, and the student must receive a grade of Pass from the third evaluator in order to complete the requirement successfully.

Special Projects must be submitted no later than December 15 for the fall semester and April 15 for the spring semester. Students selecting the thesis option must by the end of their penultimate semester have identified and secured a thesis director who will guide the student through the thesis.

The student must also have prepared a two- to three-page thesis proposal for approval by the director and a second reader appointed by the Director of Graduate Studies. The student must receive a grade of at least Pass from both readers. If one reader assigns a grade of Fail, the thesis will be read by a third faculty member, and the student must receive a grade of at least Pass from the third reader in order to complete the requirement successfully.

Theses must be submitted no later than December 10 for the fall semester and April 10 for the spring semester. Students successfully completing the thesis-option M. Their applications will be evaluated with all the other applications received for the Ph. The papers must be submitted no later that March 15 of the second semester for students entering with an MA or the fourth semester for students entering without an MA, but they may be submitted at any time before that.

A paper will be deemed publishable just in case a reader judges that it is worthy of submission to a professional journal.

Resources for Graduate Students of Romanticism

Each paper must be between and words. A paper will be graded High Pass when it is judged worthy of submission to a professional journal.

Each reader will prepare a statement regarding the strengths and weaknesses of the paper and, if necessary, of what needs to be done to improve the paper so that it is of publishable quality.

Students who not receive a High Pass grade on a qualifying paper may revise and resubmit once for reevaluation. If the resubmitted paper does not receive a High Pass, but both papers have received a grade of at least Pass, the student will be granted a terminal MA degree.

This requirement must be completed by the end of the relevant semester. This does not mean merely that the papers must be submitted by that time. Hence, students should plan accordingly and allow themselves time to revise their submitted papers and have them evaluated before the end of the fourth term.

Students are strongly encouraged to have one paper completed in the first year or certainly no later than the fall semester of the second year. Students wishing to have the review of a qualifying paper completed by the end of a fall semester must submit the paper by October 15 and students wishing to have the review of a qualifying paper completed by the end of a spring semester must submit the paper by March Students who successfully complete this requirement qualify for Ph.

Evaluating Qualifying Papers The following list of questions represents the kinds of questions that readers have in mind when evaluating qualifying papers.

To The Candidate:

It is offered here only as a guidance to students, questions that they might have in mind when composing their papers. It is important to note that different qualifying papers might have different philosophical ends and styles, and this means that for different papers different kinds of questions will come to the fore while others recede into the background.

It is also important to recognize that this set of questions is not exhaustive. Nor does this list—or any subset thereof—identify a set of sufficient conditions for a paper to receive a grade of High Pass. With those caveats, here is the list of questions: Does the paper address an important problem or issue in current philosophical scholarship?

Does it develop a clear philosophical approach or method in discussing the problem or issue at hand? Is it well organized and clear? Is the reasoning in the paper sound? Is the textual and historical scholarship sound?

Does it take into account relevant existing scholarship and publications?The following resources are an integral part of the prospectus course, PPPA, Writing a Quality Dissertation. It will be helpful for you to start reviewing these materials before enrolling in PPPA A non-Academic Council member (including former Academic Council members) may replace only one of three required members of dissertation reading committees.

The reading committee must conform to university requirements at . The General Idea: A thesis is a hypothesis or conjecture.

A PhD dissertation is a lengthy, formal document that argues in defense of a particular thesis. On Starting the Dissertation: The Reading List that Keeps on Listing March 30, Laura Kremmel 3 Comments A few weeks ago, The Chronicle of Higher Education posted a series of brief discussions about the third year of studying for a PhD.

The appendix provides a list of action words to introduce quotes, a list of suggested items for inclusion in a research proposal, a statistical decision tree, a list of general action verbs, and an impressive annotated bibliography of books on writing, research, confidence, public speaking, computers, and more.

The following resources are an integral part of the prospectus course, PPPA, Writing a Quality Dissertation.

It will be helpful for you to start reviewing these materials before enrolling in PPPA

How To Write A Dissertation